One SLU

Last changed: 17 June 2021

The emphasis in this heading is on the first word, ‘one’. By seeing SLU as one – as a whole – we strengthen our combined capacity to be the driving force for change necessary in order to achieve our vision. ‘One SLU’ that collaborates internally, with equivalent and equal opportunities for students and employees, can work more efficiently and with unified strength. ‘One SLU’ also makes what we stand for clearer to the outside world.

Overall Objective:
A stronger, unified SLU – both internally and in our external contacts

Acitivies for focus area 3 (in Swedish, pending translation to English)

Subcomponents:

  1. a)  Active and systematic work to promote a good work environment, gender equality and equal terms is conducted, wherein proactivity and internal learning are guiding principles.

  2. b)  SLU has stronger, cohesive environments, wherein our mission to conduct first-cycle education plays a larger role and has gained increased status.

  3. c) SLU has seized the opportunities offered by a geographically dispersed organisation by facilitating and strengthening collaboration across geographical and organisational boundaries, as well as between areas of activity.

  1. d)  The harmonisation of procedures and processes has created equal opportunities, regardless of the part of SLU to which employees and students belong.

  2. e)  By combining the role of university and the role of expert authority, SLU has advanced the development of knowledge.

 

Meaning:
Active and systematic work to promote a good work environment, gender equality and equal opportunities is carried out, wherein proactivity and internal learning are guiding principles.

A work and study environment that is free from discrimination and which is characterised by inclusion is a fundamental prerequisite for sustainable professional and student life. Gender equality means that everyone must have the same power to shape society and their lives, regardless of gender. At SLU, important elements for achieving this objective include gender-equal career paths and funding opportunities, as well as the incorporation of a gender equality perspective in our degree programmes. SLU shall be more proactive in its systematic work aimed at preventing ill health and accidents, combatting discrimination, and promoting equal opportunities for students and employees. In these efforts, it is essential that SLU combats restrictive norms and power systems linked to the grounds of discrimination3. It is also important to provide internal learning opportunities which allow members of the organisation to share good examples, learn from each other and work together as ‘One SLU’. The work topromote gender equality and equal terms helps to increase SLU's attractiveness as a university. It contributes to the quality of teaching and research by making use of everyone's skills.

 

SLU has stronger, cohesive environments, wherein our mission to conduct first- cycle education plays a larger role and has gained increased status.

The development of the quality and societal relevance of SLU’s degree programmes must be a clear focus for all parts of the university. Cohesive environments with close links between education, research and environmental monitoring and assessment provide good conditions for achieving a high level of quality and renewal in all the university’s activities. This is also a fundamental aspect of the idea of the ‘global university’. It is therefore desirable that the university continue to grow by increasing the scope of its education. More departments must achieve a better balance between education and research, and more teachers/researchers must conduct both teaching and research. For example, this means that the education is further backed up by strong research in the same field, and that research is stimulated through student participation. The knowledge- building of the environmental monitoring and assessment provides valuable material for students and researchers to refine, and its presence at SLU thus enhances the other areas. Cohesive environments and the increased status of education at the internal level also allow SLU to better contribute to social benefits at the external level. To achieve stronger cohesive environments, it is necessary to develop the competence provision processes that support them.

 

SLU has seized the opportunities offered by a geographically dispersed organisation by facilitating and strengthening collaboration across geographical and organisational boundaries, as well as between areas of activity.

SLU is always close, for students, employees and the world around us; it is a great asset to be present throughout the country. This yields increased opportunities for various types of collaboration with broad regional roots, which are consolidated within SLU to create a national whole. The outside world shall be able to turn to ‘One SLU’ and interact with the entire university as a collaborative partner in all our breadth, not just with each of our individual parts. By finding ways to work around the distances and create a sense of belonging and equivalence, this strength can be used to the fullest. The world around us then encounters a unified image of SLU, regardless of geographical location.

Internal collaborations provide the potential to explore and strengthen, and are made possible by bridging physical and mental barriers. One prerequisite for this is an organisational culture in which openness to new collaborations is self-evident. It is difficult to change a culture. Nonetheless, it is essential if we are to seize the opportunities that exist in a large knowledge organisation such as our university. At the heart of such an effort is a responsibility to ensure the freedom of research, a culture of mutual respect, a curiosity for other people's research questions, and a willingness to take responsibility for the scientific dialogue about the conclusions drawn from research results. This feeds the development of knowledge and generates new research questions, which is a central prerequisite for our internal collaborations and our scientific development.


The harmonisation of procedures and processes has created equal opportunities, regardless of the part of SLU to which employees and students belong.

SLU's various activities and places of activity/study all offer something unique that is worth protecting. At the same time, it is important to create equivalence and provide equal opportunities, regardless of activity. For example, this may apply to conditions for exercising good leadership and employeeship, as well as the quality of our learning environments. Harmonised administrative processes and terms, as well as appropriate organisational solutions, can be the means by which to achieve this end. All employees and students are a clear part of ‘One SLU’.

 

By combining the role of university and the role of expert authority, SLU has advanced the development of knowledge.

SLU has long had a unique mission that unites two distinct roles. These two roles – that of the university and that of the expert authority4 – are both deeply rooted and constitute a self-evident aspect of ‘One SLU’. When the outside world turns to SLU as an expert authority, SLU also reaches out to the entire world in its capacity as a governmental authority that conducts education at all levels, research, and environmental monitoring and assessment. SLU is thus able to offer something more.

It is therefore important that SLU preserve, clarify and develop its dual role. SLU shall be the first choice to contact when it is necessary to obtain expertise within our areas, and our collaboration with other expert authorities shall be developed. While both our roles are closely linked and strengthen each other, it is also important to make the difference between them clear to the outside world. Scientific debate about the interpretation of research results (often with conflicting conclusions) falls under SLU’s role as a university and shows how new knowledge develops. In its expert role, SLU can develop syntheses of such a scientific debate, in order to describe the current state of knowledge.

 

Facts:

Gender, gender identity or gender expression, ethnicity, religion or other belief, disability, sexual orientation and age.

 

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